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Effective Oral and Written Communication in Professional and Lay Domains

Cambridge, UK
Date Added : February 24, 2016 :
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Our first tutorial for the year is a continuation from where we had previously left, which was the first part of the final table of the Professional Engineers Summary Statement. This week we look into the second element of competency entitled “Effective oral and written communication in professional and lay domains.”

Communicating with supervisors, colleagues, and subordinates, is a crucial part of the skill set of every professional, and it is especially important for engineers who want to coordinate actions and collaborate on complex technical issues. This is what the second element of competency of the “Professional and Personal Attributes” table is in regards to. In this part of the Summary Statement, applicants have to fill in examples that highlight their communication and information-sharing skills.

a.) Is proficient in listening, speaking, reading and writing English.

Example: I gathered all senior engineers and technicians on site to attend a brainstorming session in English, and in the hope that this procedure would yield various solution ideas to the stuck pipe problem.

Example: I provided my instructions to the workers both orally during our daily morning meetings, and also posted them on the notice board in English for further reviewing by anyone interested.

Example: I have uploaded the in-depth technical report written in English, which explained in detail the procedure that I had developed and followed during the project to the company’s online knowledge database.

Example: Because there were diverse international teams of engineers working on the site, I selected a head representative of each nation who could understand English terminology, to reproduce my instructions in the native language of each group.

b.) Prepares high quality engineering documents such as progress and project reports, reports of investigations and feasibility studies, proposals, specifications, design records, drawings, technical descriptions and presentations pertinent to the engineering discipline.

Example: Based on the notes that I was taking each day, I developed weekly progress and status reports which I shared with the management. Every month, I wrote another report that was more focused around resources used against the total project completion.

Example: I developed a Bill of Quantities document and sent it to the Procurement department of the company in order for them to check the parts list and cost, and grant the approval for the order placement.

Example: After the new debutanizer column system was successfully commissioned, I prepared the maintenance manual for the technicians, containing suggestions for the time intervals of check or replacement of each component, as well as precautions and instructions relating to the specifications of the parts.

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Additional Links :
Membership Engineers Australia
Engineer Recognition Australia


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